Web Accessibility

Your business needs an ADA Compliant code base.

ADA website compliance is a set of accessibility standards that are detailed in Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The ADA has been modernized to establish accessibility requirements for websites and software. The purpose of ADA website compliance is to make the information on a site accessible for people with disabilities.

Making your website ADA compliant does more than just make your website accessible to those with disabilities, it also creates more opportunities to achieve an organization’s unique goals.

According to U.S. Census data, about 56.7 million Americans have a disability.

ADA website compliance empowers your business to effectively reach this large audience of potential customers or clients while also catering specifically to those with vision impairment.

User Accessibility

An ADA compliant accessibility menu like the one shown allows visitors with impairments to have a user-friendly experience on your site.

The information on your site will be made accessible for people with disabilities by adding extra code and descriptions of the content so that screen readers can properly interpret it and make it more usable to the vision impaired. These rules have been in place for many years, but they are recently receiving newfound attention as watchdog groups are starting to target businesses that are not making efforts to be compliant. Through a bulk modification to your site’s content as well as ongoing monitoring and adjustments, we can ensure that your site will provide a quality experience for all users.

One such modification is an ADA compliant accessibility menu like the one shown. This allows users with impairments to choose the appropriate setting that best suits them to experience your site in a user-friendly manner.

The core principles that guide WCAG 2.0 Level A include:

Perceivable: You want users to have the ability to perceive all the information that appears on your site, like text, images, video, and more. Even if a user can’t see your website’s text or listen to your website’s video, you need to provide an alternative.

Operable: You want users to have the capabilities to navigate your site and use all its features. Any user, for example, should have the means to use your main navigation, as well as any site tools, like calculators.

Understandable: You want users to have the means to understand your website content. That means users can understand your site’s text, images, videos, and tools. For example, your site may include instructions for using a feature, like a calculator or a contact form.

Robust: You want users to have the ability to receive the same experience, even if using assistive technologies. People reading your content versus those using a voice reader, for example, should get the same content even if it’s delivered differently.

Having your website ADA compliant helps you reach a larger target audience, improves your SEO, avoid penalties and finally making your site accessible to all visitors.

In order to prevent getting flagged as non-compliant and getting your business wrapped up in litigation, be sure that your website development is done with the understanding that not all people access the web in the same way. Incorporating a team with this thinking into your next web design project will leave you on the right side of the law. 

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